Traditional Chinese Medicine

Reclaim Your Sleep (from anywhere)

Is your mind constantly racing at bedtime?  Do you toss and turn all night, and wake up feeling like you haven’t slept at all?  Do you feel like you are walking around in a fog all day?  

You are not alone. Approximately 30-50% of adults in the US have difficulty falling and/or staying asleep, and 10% suffer from chronic insomnia. Lack of sleep can cause you to gain weightkill your sex drive, make you look older, and make it difficult to concentrate at workYou may feel hopeless because you’ve exhausted OTC remedies, sleeping medications, and the standard lifestyle changesYour doctor may have prescribed sleeping pills, but they leave you feeling groggy.

Chinese medicine has answers to this common modern-day challenge, Let me tap into my expertise as a Chinese medicine sleep specialist and certified life coach and the knowledge I’ve gained from working with hundreds of clients with sleep issues to create a personalized plan to help you fall asleep quickly and wake feeling rested.

For the best results, I recommend a series of 5 weekly 30-45 minute Zoom sessions.

Your personalized plan will include simple techniques you can apply immediately to fall asleep more quickly and wake feeling more rested, 1-2 hours of homeplay each week and coaching on successful adoption of manageable lifestyle changes.

Call me at 815-814-1319 or email amy@northshoreacupuncturecenter.com to schedule a free evaluation.
Note: This program will not address sleep issues related to physical pain, medication or other health issues.

Amy Landolt’s Bio 

Amy is a licensed acupuncturist and certified life coach specializing in sleep. She helps people reclaim their sleep using Chinese medicine, essential oils, supplements, and lifestyle changes. Amy is passionate about finding natural ways to improve sleep because in 2011, insomnia was impacting her work and personal life. Sleeping pills helped her sleep, but left her feeling groggy. She was frustrated that her doctor’s only suggestion was different (and more) pills. It was only after a combination of acupuncture, massage and yoga that she was able to sleep through the night and wake rested and refreshed. 

She learned that she needed to take the lead in managing her health and fully leverage all of the natural ways to address any health challenges, and she loves helping others do the same. 

What other people have to say: 

For about two years now I have been suffering from terrible seasonal allergies. The inability to breathe through my nose left me restless. I would take a cocktail of allergy medications and sleeping aids, but still no luck. After visiting an allergist,I was able to get that issue under control, however the anxiety of sleep and lack of it still haunted me. I was breathing just fine at night, but my mind was constantly racing and anticipating. My body would eventually pass out from exhaustion around 6am and I’d wake around 8amRunning on two hours of restless sleep left me feeling drained, fatigue and moody during the day. I felt like I had tried everything a western doctor would suggest: sleeping tablets, melatonin, setting a bedtime routine, but nothing worked. I told my allergist about this issue and she suggested I try acupuncture by Amy Landolt. 

Amy prescribed a holistic regime of meditation, yoga and herbs. The night after my first appointment I slept the most I had in months. After a month of working with Amy, one-to-two-times a week, I am sleeping more restfully than ever. Along with acupuncture she advised to incorporate yoga and medication which has helped speed up the healing process as well as helped me grow as a person.” P.L. 

 

“After my first session, I slept from 12:15 until 6:45am. Wow! A full six and ½ hours. I woke up feeling more rested than I have in about six months. Lack of sleep was leaving me feeling fatigued most of the day, every day. It was hard to focus on any project, personal or professional, to see it through to conclusion. Or if I did, it required more time than ever. I know I was more irritable than usual, too. I had tried sleeping apps, lifestyle changes, and cognitive behavioral techniques. After four sessions, I am sleeping 6-7 hours most nights, which I hadn’t for over a year.  

THANK YOU!!! I am now excited to go to bed at night! Often I have a sort of low-level dread as the hour draws nigh! Now I am excited to use my oils, listen to the meditation you suggested, and reclaim my sleep!!!”  M.M. 

 

“I was having a lot of trouble sleeping, not being able to fall asleep or if I did, couldn’t stay asleep.  It was horrible. After just a few sessions, I’m getting a good night’s rest, which is so important for our brains! I have clarity of thought and I no longer feel like I’m walking around in a fog all day. I appreciated your laid- back, easy going style, and your concern for my comfort and my results.  My husband was surprised that it’s worked!  He’s not necessarily open to new ideas and treatments but was happy that I’ve gotten results.”  C.S. 

Regrowth: Spring and Traditional Chinese Medicine

Three thousand years ago, when Chinese medicine was first being practiced, there was no light or electricity. No way to mask the darkness of winter. No way, either, to ignore the longer, warmer days of springtime. Because it is such an ancient practice, a lot of the wisdom of Traditional Chinese Medicine comes from a time when people spent much more time outside, paying attention to the natural world around them.  continue reading »

5 Acupoints for Anxiety You Can Administer Yourself

acupoints for anxiety

“At a time when people are so conscious of maintaining their physical health by controlling their diets, exercising, and so forth, it makes sense to try to cultivate the corresponding mental attitudes too.”

– HH the Dalai Lama, 1963

It can be easy to forget how much our mental state can affect our physical well-being. In Traditional Chinese Medicine, that connection is evident in the treatment strategies, but it is also true that when we are feeling bad, we don’t always think to look at our minds. It works both ways.  continue reading »

Acupuncture for Diabetes

Acupuncture for Diabetes

More than 34 million Americans have diabetes, and approximately 90 percent of them have type 2 diabetes, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 

Type 2 diabetes, while its exact cause is unknown, develops when the body becomes resistant to insulin or the pancreas doesn’t produce enough insulin. Because of this, treatment often involves taking “insulin sensitizers” or medication that helps the body increase its sensitivity and therefore ability to process insulin, keeping the blood sugar from getting too low. Unfortunately, this medication often causes side effects, including weight gain and anemia. continue reading »

Acupuncture Wrapped: An overview of some of the most exciting discoveries in 2020

Acupuncture Wrapped: An overview of some of the most exciting discoveries in 2020

As we enter a new year, it is natural to want to look back on the last one. As humans, we have the gift and the hurdle of marking time, so it can feel helpful to recall memories we want to hold on to or look for lessons we can take with us.  

To that end, here are three categories in which research into the type, application and efficacy of acupuncture saw significant advancements in 2020, findings that will certainly help guide us as we move forward. In a year that saw so much focus on our health, these findings offer some good news in the fields of pain management without opioids, migraine headaches, and insight into why it is that acupuncture is effective as an anti-inflammatory.  continue reading »

Intention setting in the new year

Intention setting in the new year

It’s that time of year again: the time when many of us engage in the practice of setting a new year’s resolution.

It seems, though, that hand-in-hand with new year’s resolutions is the prediction of inevitable failure. That as soon as you pick a resolution, you won’t actually make it through the whole year sticking with the new behavior, or that by the third week of January the resolution will be out of sight, out of mind. So, I wanted to offer some tips on how to join in the tradition in a way that might foster more success, by incorporating some wisdom from traditional Chinese medicine. continue reading »

You’re Getting Sleepy…

Enjoying Naps in the Winter Season

Most mammals are polyphasic sleepers, meaning that they sleep for short periods throughout the day. For humans, days are divided into two distinct periods, one for sleep and one for wakefulness, which is a monophasic sleep pattern. However, this may be a product of living in an industrialized world and not the natural sleep pattern of humans. In many cultures, young children and elderly take naps midday. Our bodies are programmed for two periods of intense sleepiness a day: between 2 and 4 am and 1 and 3 pm. Unfortunately, despite our biological vestige, we are having to consolidate our sleep into one long period. continue reading »

Winter and your Kidneys

Winter and your Kidneys

In Traditional Chinese Medicine, health is achieved by living in balance with nature and the seasons. Winter, the season of the Water Element, is the season for slowing down, reflecting, and conserving our resources. We all feel this tendency, but we don’t always listen to our bodies.  In Western culture, being active is rewarded and expected. We feel compelled to keep up the hectic pace that is typical in our daily lives.

This season is associated with the kidneys, bladder, and adrenal glands and the time of year when these organs are most active, accessible, and even vulnerable. They are more receptive to being restored, nurtured, and energized. At the same time, it is also when they can become easily depleted. continue reading »

What Is Seasonal Affective Disorder?

Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) is a condition believed to be linked to a lack of sunlight where the individual experiences mood changes and emotions similar to depression. SAD occurs mostly in the Fall and Winter months when there is less sunlight exposure.

It’s found that around 5 percent of people may experience SAD lasting 40% of the year (especially in areas with less sunlight such as the Pacific Northwest and other Northern regions), and it is more common in women than in men. continue reading »

Acupuncture and Autoimmune Diseases

Autoimmune diseases are a collective group of disorders that plague nearly 50 million people in the United States today. When a person suffers from an autoimmune disease it means their own immune system is attacking the body and altering or destroying the tissues. Autoimmune diseases include things like rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, Crohn’s disease, pernicious anemia, multiple sclerosis, irritable bowel disease and Parkinson’s disease. continue reading »

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